e-learning videos

Module 1 – Initiating the consultation
1. Why is good initiation important?
9. Screening
2. Preparation
10. Shared aims for the consultation
3. Greeting patients
11. Initiation: Example 1 – Junior ward doctor: First seizure
4. Introducing yourself
12. Initiation: Example 2 – ED:Palpitations/AF
5. Addressing the purpose of the consultation
13. Double checking nothing missed
6. Early attention to patient’s perspective
14. Initiation: Example 3 – GP: Urinary problems
7. Opening question
15. Doctors reflection on initiating
8. Listening
Module 2 – Structuring the consultation
1. Signposting – ED: Palpitations
4. Signposting – GP: Urinary problems
2. Signposting – Cardiology: AF
5. Attending to flow
3. Summarising – GP: Urinary problems
6. Structuring – how could it help in this example?
Module 3 – History taking and gathering information
1. The importance of good history taking
7. Clarify – timings and details
2. History taking requires multi-tasking
8. Explore – summarise periodically
3. History taking example – GP2: Urinary problems
9. Explore – use language carefully
4. Listen – let the patient tell their story
10. Explore – facilitate responses
5. Listen – Show that you are listening
11. Explore – avoid leading or double questions
6. Clarify – respond to clues
12. Open and closed questions
Module 4 – Communicating through the physical examination
1. Skilful multitasking – examining and communicating
5. Examination – a chance to build the relationship
2. Examination – a chance to gather more history
6. Summarising your findings: example – ED1:SOB
3. Examination – a chance to check your diagnosis
7. Summarising your findings: example – ED2:SOB
4. Examination – a chance to prompt concerns
8. Summarising your findings: example – ED3:Palpitations>
Module 5 – Building the relationship
1. Why is relationship important?
8. Maintaining rapport
2. Example consultation – ED palpitations/AF
9. Reacting to patient’s perspective – eg1
3. Non-verbals 1
10. Reacting to patient’s perspective – eg2
4. Non-verbals 2
11. Showing empathy 1
5. Using proximity 1
12. Showing empathy 2
6. Using proximity 2
13. Involve the patient
7. Developing rapport at the start
Module 6 – Explanation and planning
1. Why is good explanation and planning important?
9. Check patient’s needs
2. Setting the scene – whole consultation – ED:Palpitations/AF
10. Putting explaining skills together – Cardiology DR:AF1
3. Starting point
11. Explaining in an emotional context
4. Chunk and check
12. Putting explaining skills together – GP:Urinary difficulties
5. What else does the patient want to know?
13. Putting explaining skills together – Cardiology DR:AF2
6. Explaining – pace and language
14. E&P example – GP1:Urinary difficulties
7. E&P example – GP2:Urinary difficulties
15. Shared decisions and planning – Surgeon:Gallstones
8. Too much information
16. Shared decisions and planning – Cardiology DR:AF
Module 7 – Closing the consultation
1. The end of a consultation – Surgeon: Gallstones
10. A patient’s perspective – emotions
2. Why is closing important? A patient’s view
11. A doctor’s response to emotions
3. Choose an appropriate point to end things
12. A patient’s perspective – taking on board advice
4. Forward planning – integrating with patient’s perspective
13. Patient appreciates effort of doctor to understand his perspective
5. Forward planning – the doctor’s view
14. Inviting response from patient to a plan
6. Share the plan
15. The doctor continues to explore perspective to the end
7. Non verbal communication
16. Handling difficult topics
8. Thinking ahead to the closing
17. Don’t leave all the questions until the end
9. Linking closing to the rest of the consultation
Subtitled Videos
1. Shared decision making (subtitled)
2. Gathering information (subtitled)

N.B. Some users are finding that these videos don’t run in Internet Explorer. Try another browser if you are affected.

If you want to download any of these videos for your own presentations, you can do so from the Vimeo video website (accessible by going to Vimeo.com and searching for UKCCC).